7am together

7am together

The fog rolls in at 7am. At first it’s far away, vague, “what is this?” You become wary, uneasy, because it is coming towards you rather fast and from all sides. Oh dear. Before you know it, it’s all around you and you can’t see two feet in front of you. You’re not sure where you are and if you take a step in the wrong direction, you might fall off a cliff.

7am and my heart is pounding. It pulls me awake, like someone poking me and very politely reminding me that I have to be on stage in front of thousands of people in five minutes to give a speech about the socializing habits of penguins — something I’m sure I am extremely unqualified to discuss. I’m sweating and icky and uncomfortable. My chest is tight and I’m shaking inside.

It’s not the first time, of course. The first time was much scarier. By now it’s more of a bother than anything else. Not this again, I’m tired, I was hoping to sleep well tonight.

When I come back from the restroom and stumble into bed, my partner stirs. “Are you having trouble sleeping again?” In his gentlest, most caring, slightly sleepy voice. So I tell him all about the fog. I tell him it’s okay and it’ll pass eventually, but that’s not good enough for him.

“I want to help,” he says. “I want to help.”

He strokes my stomach and even though I am barely aware of the touch, even though I can’t see through the fog, it makes me happy. How about that? I didn’t use to think panic attacks and joy could occur at the same time. But they can. They can and at 7am that day, they do.

7am is very early for us night owls. We may have gone to bed at 3 or 4.

He offers to make me some tea. My partner. And that’s what he does. We both get up and I sit on the couch while he goes into the kitchen and brews me a peppermint.

“Do you think you’ll be able to go back to sleep? You seem pretty awake.”

No, I won’t be able to go back to sleep. It’s too late and too early at the same time.

And then to my surprise, well, no, not surprise. It’s more like an emotional realization. And then to my emotional realization, he pours himself some cereal, turns on the PS4, and sits with me.

At 7am, both exhausted, we play games and have tea and cereal together. He could go back to sleep. It’s obvious. But he doesn’t. Willingly, he lets himself feel a bit worse so that I can feel a bit better.

That.

That is love.

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The rain has gone

The rain has gone

Wotcher, friends!

So I have a confession to make.

I am on antidepressants. Escitalopram, 10mg a day. Have been for nearly three years now.


TRIGGER WARNING.

I am about to engage in a discussion that could inadvertently hurt some people. However important the topic at hand – and I do believe it is important – nothing is more important than your own health. If you tend to be triggered by talk of depression, please read at your own discretion.


The first psychiatrist I ever went to told me I had a bad case of the blues.

“You’re still young, you shouldn’t disengage from your life like that.”

I was shaking and unable to talk properly so I just nodded, but deep down I was angry at her. I felt dismissed. I blamed her for not just understanding, for not seeing through my slightly-less-stiff-than-usual upper lip. After all, it was her job to read my mind, wasn’t it?

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Unfortunately, it isn’t easy for someone who hasn’t experienced depression to imagine what it actually does. And that’s totally normal. You shouldn’t be expected to just know. On the flip side, it isn’t easy either for someone currently suffering through it to explain how they feel.

So this is me attempting to communicate some thoughts and feelings, from the easier standpoint of “two and a half years later”. Cue cheesy flashback transition.

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It started very suddenly, a little after my landlord passed away. I didn’t know him all that well. He wasn’t a close friend or a family member, and it’s not like I thought about him every day. Yet when he tragically, abruptly, died, something was triggered inside of me.

I started thinking about death every day. Mine. Depression is narcissistic like that. Then I started thinking about death every hour. Then every minute. I had had “the blues” before, but this wasn’t it. This was different. It felt permanent. It felt like I was broken. It involved an endless circle of downs (numb apathy) and even-further-downs (locking myself in the bathroom and crying my eyes out in panic).

Now, you have to understand that my life didn’t suck. Actually, it was quite amazing. But depression isn’t really about all the bad stuff that is going on in your life. It’s more twisted than that. No matter how incredibly fantastic my life might be, depression constantly reminded me that it would still have to end and that all the incredible fantasticness would be lost forever.

In my ill mind, this progression of events:

  1. be born
  2. follow your dreams
  3. get your novels published
  4. find love
  5. be happy
  6. die

… was exactly the same as this one:

  1. be born
  2. die

This is not how a human brain is supposed to work. If it were, then there is a decent chance life would have died out years and years ago.

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No.

This is a glitch.

 

 

Yet there is a stigma in our society. When I started this post with a “confession”, I wasn’t using the word lightly. For some reason, admitting to being depressed, especially to the point of needing medication to function properly, has become – or maybe it has always been – a confession.

You whisper it, mumble it, beat around the bush. You rationalize it away. “Oh, I’m taking meds for now but I’m going to stop soon.” It has somehow become shameful to take antidepressants.

Don’t get me wrong, if you don’t feel that medication is the right way for you to go about fighting your depression, then I’m certainly not here to tell you you’re wrong. I don’t pretend to know everyone’s experiences, nor do I pretend to be a doctor.

But it seems to me that nobody goes around telling diabetic people to stop shooting themselves full of drugs. When you have a headache, it’s fairly rare for your friends to suggest maybe you shouldn’t take painkillers because then you wouldn’t be yourself anymore.

This is something I have actually been told. I have been told I’m just drugging myself up and that it keeps me from seeing the world as it is.

This is bullshit. Dangerous, radioactive bullshit – go on, take a moment to picture that, I’ll be waiting.

Done?

Okay, seriously though. When you say something like that to a depressed person, you are effectively telling a very vulnerable, sick human being that they will never be happy ever again. Even if you believe that to be true, how sadistic do you have to be to think it’s a good thing to say? It’s not funny or helpful. In fact, it can cause very severe harm.

I wasn’t feeling like myself, and I was deeply unhappy, and now that I take “the drugs”, I’m more able to connect with other people, I feel like myself more often, more easily, and I’m happier. This isn’t to say that the world isn’t absurd and weird and that it’s abnormal to feel alienated by that. But it doesn’t take a genius to see that if you used to be happy and now you’re not, then there’s probably something wrong.

 

It is not cool or edgy or deep to be miserable.

 

I take antidepressants for the same reason I take anti-allergy medication. Because otherwise I would be a wheezy, teary-eyed, non-functional mess, unable to accomplish any of the simple tasks of everyday life. Because otherwise, I wouldn’t be able to be myself.

And you know what? Two and a half years later, I am myself again.

The Cyst

The Cyst
An early exercise about memoir writing. This is a true story. Maybe a boring story, but a true story nonetheless.

A cyst, that’s all it was. Just a cyst. Benign is what it was. But I still wanted it off. It had been here long enough. Years, in fact; and I would even go so far as to say five years. More than five years maybe. Anyway it was there and protruding and staring back whenever I looked down at my wrist and it was bad enough. I had been roaming the Internet in search of ways to get rid of it, which was definitely not the right way to go about it. You see, the only people who actually take the time to post anything on forums are the ones who have had a bad experience and want to complain. I had surgery a year ago and now it’s come back and it hurts like hell and my wrist is stiff and my doctor is an incompetent fraud and I hate the entire universe, that sort of thing. Scary as all that sounded, my brain and my mum suggested that I seek the advice of an actual medical professional before deciding whether or not it was wiser to just keep the damn thing on my wrist for all my life.

The doctor I saw about it I shall always consider a true hero. I showed him the cyst, and here is what he said: “Oh, it’s a synovial cyst, it’s not dangerous but it’s a nuisance, you have to get rid of it. Here is the name of a great surgeon.” Not “you have the option of surgery”. Not “you might want to have it removed”. He made the decision I was afraid to take, and I must say if he hadn’t phrased it like he did, I may very well have chickened out. He probably saw that plain on my face.

I called the surgeon. Two months later, I was checking into the hospital. Minor surgery like that is usually done in one day. Walk in, get sliced up, get stitched right back, walk out again. But due to a latex allergy, I had to spend the night. They wanted to make sure I would be the first one to be sliced up the next morning. Spending the night in a hospital room proved to be the worst part of the experience and one of the weirdest creepiest things I have ever had to endure. Needless to say I did not sleep. I don’t think anybody sleeps in hospitals at night. For one thing the smell was unpleasant. It was the smell of wrongness, like if you went to sleep, you might never wake up. And for another thing a woman was moaning and whimpering and calling all night. It was quite hard to judge the distance in the dark. She might have been in the next room, just as she might have been at the other end of the corridor. Felt as if the hospital itself was crying for help. “Please” the hospital moaned. “Please, help please!” And a tired nurse’s feet would shuffle by my door to wherever the plead came from. “What is it, ma’am?” “Please, I want to get up!” “You can’t get up right now, ma’am, you just had surgery.” “But I need to get up.” “No, you can’t get up right now, ma’am.” All night long. When I got bored of feeling sorry for myself, I started feeling sorry for that nurse.

Then, in the morning, she came in, handed me one of those blouses they give to patients to make sure they’re quite uncomfortable, told me to go take a shower and mispronounced my name. I felt less sorry for her.

After that, the rest was a piece of cake, really. It probably had something to do with the tranquilizer the anaesthetist put in my IV. The surgeon was definitely not an incompetent fraud. The cyst has been gone for more than a year, now. It hasn’t come back, it hasn’t tried phoning, and I received no postcard. It is a small thing, but I’m just a little bit happier than I was before. Although I had promised myself that if the surgery was successful, I would talk about it on forums to balance all the negativity, I did not. I guess happy people are quick to move on.

Go the distance

Good mooooooorning 2017!

Wotcher, everyone! So. I’ve disappeared from the blogosphere for about a month. How have you been? This is going to be freestyle, from me to you, no fancy stuff. Also, I’m writing this in bed at 1.23 in the morning, on my iPhone, with Betty looking over my shoulder. Say hi to Betty.

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So there.

I have had good reason to disappear, though, and I bring back some amazing news. My wonderful partner is here with me, in the little nest I’ve been building for us in our little corner of Canada since September. Okay, so it’s amazing news for me. Deal with it.

Our story began in the summer of 2014, when we came across each other on the amazing forums of asexuality.org (which is not, repeat not, a dating site, because they have minors on here and can’t monitor every… whoops). We talked and talked about everything and it turns out that’s how you tend to fall in love with people. Well, that’s how *I* tend to fall in love with people anyway.

Some people will swear to you that long distance relationships never work out. That’s because some people conflate the impossibility of a long distance relationship *for them* with a scientific, all-encompassing-applies-to-me-so-it-must-apply-to-everything sort of truth.

I’m sure it wouldn’t work for everyone. Maybe the fact that we are both asexual makes it easier for us to go fifteen months without touching each other. Whatever the reasons, it worked for us.

Which does not mean it was easy every day. Sometimes it was really hard not to be able to hug or hold hands or just give each other a reassuring pat on the arm.

Sometimes people would dismiss our relationship. It’s not serious, they haven’t even met yet. It’s not serious, they’ve only spent two weeks together. You don’t really know anything about him until you’ve met him in the flesh.

Phil and I have been together for two years and four months. But as far as some people are concerned, Phil and I have been together for six weeks.

As far as I’m concerned, though, there is nothing I would change about how our relationship started out and blossomed. I wouldn’t change the distance. I wouldn’t change the online chats. They are part of us now and they made us, a couple of introverts, into Us: a Couple of Introverts.

But, while I wouldn’t change anything, the time had come to live together for a significant amount of time. So on December 3rd, I picked up my fiancé at the airport (funny story, that, but not for tonight) and we went home together.

So there you have it. This is my excuse for abandoning you for a month. A jolly good excuse, too, if you ask me.

However, this isn’t an end to anything. This is a new start, for a new year. And in keeping with the spirit of the season, I would like to commit to more writing, more blogging, and hopefully less lonely nights.

Much love and season’s greetings, my lovelies.

 

15 things

15 things

Hullo, there, lovely people!

This is day two of WordPress University and today’s assignment is about lists. I love reading blogs in list-form. They’re usually clear, easy to read, informative yet personal… everything I like about blogs. When they’re well-written, obviously.

Making lists helps me feel in control of my life. I mean, obviously, you can’t be entirely in control, because what’s the fun in that? But for someone who stresses out about every single thing out there, a list is reassuring. So I started listing things for this post, randomly. Whatever came into my mind. And soon enough I realised that I was compiling a list of things that make up my calm self. The me that feels in control.

So without further ado, here is a reassuring list of other reassuring things and self-affirming things in my life, in no particular order. Hopefully some of them can help you too.


 

1 – My partner

I thought I’d start with the most obviously important. Having love in your life, in any shape or form (not necessarily romantic love, mind), is vital. To me specifically, my partner is a very important anchor in my life. I’ve often heard that committing to a relationship is like giving up on your freedom. But here is the deal, okay? There is nothing wrong with planning your life around another person. In fact, the degree of commitment I share with my partner is liberating. We can count on each other and that makes me feel more free than I’ve ever felt before.

2 – ASMR

ASMR stands for Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response. Have you ever used one of those head massager things that look like metal spider legs? That almost unbearable tingly feeling along your scalp and down your spine? ASMR is when you get this feeling without any actual physical touch. This reflexive response can result from different auditory triggers, such as the light tapping of nails against a glass jar, the swooshing sound of a paintbrush against a microphone, or a soft whispering voice. Some lovely YouTubers create experimental videos of triggers, often mixed in with some relaxing roleplaying. This is all about imagining yourself in calming situations, concentrating on something to forget your everyday worries.

3 – Writing

Okay, this one barely requires explanation. Writing is good for you, let’s leave it at that. Try it. Nobody needs to read the result if you don’t want to. You can write for yourself. How about a dream journal? Or a diary? Or, hey, a blog!

4 – Yoga

It’s very widely-known that yoga has all sorts of benefits. A few years of yoga have made me a lot calmer and a lot less prone to stress over little things. It’s a process. Doesn’t happen overnight, but you do start feeling the results quite quickly. And then you get to a point where every single session leaves you walking home with a skip in your step and wandering eyes, happily checking out the architecture of the city you weren’t even noticing anymore. I practice Hatha yoga, the slow, traditional kind, based on balance and strength, and holding postures for five to seven breaths. It’s harder than it looks and it’s wonderful, even if you don’t buy into all that chakra esoterism. I know I don’t.

5 – Picking out clothes

I can’t quite believe I’m saying this, because clothes used to be the last thing on my mind, but it is true that picking out your outfit to match your current mood can make your day brighter and just easier to go through. This is especially the case for people who tend to feel body dysphoria. I’m genderqueer. Androgynous. Genderfluid. Ambivalent. One of those, or all of them. I’m still working on the label (more on that later). Some days, I change my clothes three times, looking to find my sense of “self”, my comfort zone. This isn’t because I’m vain. It’s because I’m trying to be myself and clothes contribute to that a lot. Don’t let anyone make you feel bad for taking that time to put on your “me” clothes.

6 – Bath items and skin care

Another obvious one, I guess, but it’s true. For one thing, picking out your scent is an important thing. Smell is one of our most primal senses. For another, the time you set aside to do a clay mask or paint your toenails or even just put on an extra layer of conditioner in the shower, is your moment. It’s just for yourself, it’s not something you’re doing for work. When I’m brushing my hair after the shower, with my bamboo brush, I make sure to not just go through the motions. Really feel it. Feel that you’re taking good care of yourself and that anyone who loves you would want you to take good care of yourself. Even if it means not answering the phone or glancing at the agenda at the same time.

7 – Decorating

Ever since I met my partner – even a bit before, actually – I’ve had this strong nesting instinct. I’ve wanted a place that could be my home, that I’d make mine by picking out furniture, decorations, drapes and cushions. For an introvert, having a comfy place that feels like it’s yours, your den, can save you from a mental breakdown. My personal favourites are soft things. Blankets, plushies, cushions… Hell, now I want to build a fort in the living-room!

8 – Music

Especially singing. In my last post I mentioned the fact that I could actually live without writing if I had to. I’m not sure I could live without ever singing. It’s like a reflex. I sing in the shower, I sing when I’m doing the dishes, I sing along to the tunes in TV shows. Singing is a beautiful thing that many animals do. It expresses feelings, and it’s very relaxing because it forces the air to come out of your lungs slowly and rhythmically. It even soothes my stomachaches. You guys, it’s magic!

9 – Plushies and Disney

Don’t laugh. Okay, laugh if you want. There are about fifteen plushies in my one-bedroom flat right now and some of them were even bought when I was a kid. Soft toys are the allergic kid’s pets and the shy kid’s friends. They are cuddling and cute and they make me smile. Sue me. In the same I’m-a-four-year-old-in-the-body-of-an-adult vein, I also watch Disney movies. And I love most of them, still. A story doesn’t become less important or less valid, just because it is aimed at young people. Neither does a plushie.

10 – Coloring

I can’t draw to save my life, and it has a lot to do with the fact that I’m a ginormous clutz. But it also has to do with my inability to make decisions. What should I draw? What should I do? Where should I start? A coloring book is much better and more relaxing for me because the decisions are already pretty much made for you. It’s a tree. It’s there. All you have to do is pick out a color you like and concentrate on the tiny leaves. Again, it’s all a matter of concentrating on something very specific in order to keep your brain from going all over the place and back again.

11 – Countryside

Nature makes me happy. I think I’m not the only one. The city can be a stressful place, even the most friendly one. I live in Quebec City, a rather friendly city where people aren’t constantly walking on your toes or pushing you around. Still, sometimes, seeing a large expanse of trees, fields and sky, entirely devoid of buildings, can be a literal breath of fresh air. I want to be able to take the train at the weekend and spend time in the countryside. It’s usually doable. No countryside is too far away to be reached, if you really want to reach it.

12 – Reading

Writers read. It’s quite natural. Let me tell you a secret, though. It’s been a long time since I’ve had the time and mind space required to read a decent-sized novel. And that’s okay, it happens. A long read is a commitment and you have to be in the right mind frame. If, like me, you’re having trouble reading long books, for any reason, here’s my tip: Snoopy. I’ve been reading the Peanuts series for a while and not only is it fast-paced and easy to read, it’s incredibly philosophical and well written.

13 – Essential oil diffuser

I’d wanted one for a long time and I finally bought one from Amazon.ca. It’s a simple enough little device, with a wooden finish to make it look natural. You just put in water and a few drops of your favorite scent, and voilà. It lights up if you want it to, in a lot of different colors. It emits a constant little buzzing sound that I was worried about at first, but it turns out it’s quite soothing. I turn it on every night and would highly recommend it.

14 – Tea

Anyone who spent ten minutes in my house would know I love tea. All sorts of tea. Green, black, white, herbal… Tea warms you up and makes you want to sit at the computer and write. I know some people find that tea is a bit bland, and maybe it’s true of some teas. What I would say is that half the enjoyment of tea actually comes from the smell. If you like the scent of a tea, then why not just hold the smoking mug under your nose and get a nice big whiff. Take your time, really breathe in and out and in again. The next sip will be that much more tasty.

15 – Introspection

Introspection is a fancy word for “obsessing about yourself narcissistically while staring at the ceiling”. Because it seems that, for some reason, obsessing about yourself narcissistically while staring at the ceiling isn’t a very productive thing to do. Sometimes that’s true. Sometimes it’s not productive. Sometimes you’re just thinking of how much you suck and how you hate yourself. But thinking about your identity, about who you are and what you want from life can be very productive and very self-affirming. It’s helpful to occasionally take a step back and glance at the big picture of your life, goals and dreams.


 

So there you have it, folks. These are things that help me sort of keep my life from boiling over and melting my brain. Do you have any of those little things to help you relax or put things in perspective? Share in the comments, if you’d like.

Breaking the taboo: social phobia

Breaking the taboo: social phobia

It’s like there’s a tiny chink in your armor and the anxiety seeps in through it. It makes it hard to breathe and hard to rest. It makes it hard to live.

Sometimes it’s just brewing quietly in the background. You wake up and feel the squeeze in your chest, familiar and annoying. You go to the shop and the cashier asks you a question you weren’t anticipating. You had a whole list in your head of what would be asked of you at the till. Need a bag? Cash, debit or credit? Do you have the loyalty card? What is this unexpected question? Is there a problem? The grip on your heart tightens. You ask them to repeat. “Do you want the receipt?” “Oh, no thanks.” And you walk out. And you feel stupid and lame.

Sometimes it gets bad. It boils over and comes out in thirty-or-so-minute bouts of crying and gasping and snotting up everything in sight. You’re four years old, helpless and you know you can’t make it in the world. It’s scary, it’s huge and you’re alone. When you step out of the house, you can never be yourself and it’s eating at you. It will never get better. Even if you manage to force yourself out there, you will never be a natural at it. You will never be normal. You will have to go through life faking it.

I’ve just had a phone interview. A bad one. I rambled on, searched for my words and couldn’t find them, and ended up saying stuff I didn’t even mean, just so that stuff would come out of my mouth. Just to avoid the awkward silence. I’m beating myself up pretty bad about it of course. Thoughts like “you’re stupid”, “what must they think of you now” and “no one would ever hire you to do anything” are swirling about in the old overcooked noodle.

Then, my uncle calls, wants to know how it went. Well, not great. I sigh. I was having a panic attack all the way through. I was so, so nervous. My uncle, meaning well, replies the worst possible thing he could reply in that particular moment. “Well, you didn’t tell them that, did you?” Did you? Like telling them how I felt, like being myself would have been a terrible, unforgiving mistake. Like surely I’m not stupid enough to admit to such a flaw, such a defect, during an interview.

Now. It seems to me that the struggle inside, more often than not, comes from outside. That chink in your armor? Something made it. And I’m pretty sure a big part of the problem is this taboo we have on social phobia. Nobody is supposed to admit to being scared of people. Not when it matters. You can say it in your own home, in private. A select few can know about it, but you can never tell a stranger. You can never tell your boss, your colleagues, your interviewer. Social inadequacy is shameful and unprofessional.

A few weeks later I’m called in for another interview, another job. I go in and meet the owners of the shop, a lovely couple. They’re nice and encouraging and it makes me want to open up. It makes me want to be honest. So I tell them. They ask me if I would be okay working in a shop. Understandably, they worry that I won’t be able to pro-actively welcome the customers. I do my best to reassure them, thinking maybe I shouldn’t have told them. Maybe I just ruined my chances.
And then the man says something that really takes me by surprise. “Let’s say you have a flaw, and it’s not social anxiety. Because I think that’s more of a character trait than a flaw. What would your flaw be?”
I freeze.
Social anxiety, not a flaw, but a character trait?
I stammer and hesitate and can’t think of anything else. It’s odd. I’m usually good at introspecting. Obsessing egotistically about myself is what I do best. But I’m stumped because now I’m thinking of something else. What if he’s right? What if it is in fact just part of who I am? What if, instead of fighting it, I’m allowed to embrace it?

Of course it doesn’t come all at once after a big revelation moment. It takes time and work and it’s too soon to tell if I will permanently take this new perspective on board.
What I do know is this: when asked to describe myself, social phobia is one of the first things that come to mind. I’m a writer. I’m asexual. I have social phobia. It’s right up there. It’s important. And yet, I hesitate. I look for a way around it. I try to phrase it in such a fashion that it doesn’t seem so bad.

“Shy” is a word I’ve been throwing around a lot. Sometimes it’s “a little bit shy”. Shy is okay. Shy is endearing. But shy isn’t it. Sobbing for fifteen minutes after making an official phone call isn’t shyness. Crossing the street to avoid having to say hello to an acquaintance isn’t shyness. It’s embarrassing, is what it is. It’s shameful. And because of the shame, “it” becomes “It” with a capital “I”. It becomes a monster that we each have to fight on our own in secret.

But what if we decided to come out of hiding? What if we all started embracing our social fears? Because if you’re scared and I’m scared, then we have something in common and maybe we can be less scared together. Maybe we can repair the chink in the armor and set the monster back quite a few HPs in only one throw of the dice.

This second interview ended with the lovely owners telling me that my anxiety doesn’t show that much, and that I probably shouldn’t even mention it in the future. You know what, though? If this is who I am, then I want people to know.